Rethinking the Family Portrait: Our Day at the Trick Eye Museum

Trick Eye Museum - Shrink

After several months of not having a single photo together, I’d say my family and I finally got to declare sweet revenge. Two hours, three albums, and 200+ pictures later, we could say that revenge was best served in a myriad of poses.
Continue reading “Rethinking the Family Portrait: Our Day at the Trick Eye Museum”

Yey for Australia Day in Sydney!

After back-to-back days of nature-tripping in Melbourne, we hurled ourselves back to the urban jungle, this time in the heart of Sydney! It was a cool coincidence that we arrived just in time for Australia Day. Festivities were in full swing in almost every nook, despite the unusual rainy weather. On the train, I glimpsed at kids and adults alike proudly bearing the Union-Jack on their board shorts, capes and even temp tattoos. Continue reading “Yey for Australia Day in Sydney!”

Happy Feet and the Wildlife of Australia

Everyone has their destination must-do; for Geebee, it was to see the Penguin Parade at Phillip Island. Fortunately, it wasn’t that difficult at all to arrange a day trip. It took us just a couple of sites before we set our hearts upon the fairly-priced Phillip Island package offered by Wildlife Tours.

We sneaked in a quick breakfast jaunt at the Queen Victoria Market, before rushing back to the hostel, where our tour coach was to pick us up at 11 am. Continue reading “Happy Feet and the Wildlife of Australia”

2011 and Bugsy

Coming across Paulo Coelho’s story of Ali, Aydi and the fire of friendship, I immediately thought of this gorgeous throng of kindred spirits from childhood that I am blessed to have. As 2011 was the year I was reunited with my blood sisters, I felt that 2011 was also the year for another batch of my sisters — Bugsy. The year that just had past … Continue reading 2011 and Bugsy

2011’s Gift of Sisters Galore (a.k.a. the ‘Ganda-mo-teh’ post)

 

In the Gagno residence, we have a gaggle — a gaggle of 5 spunky girls, each of whom went their own way as they grew up, with literally an ocean between them. Yet I would remember 2011 as the year that brought all of us together under the same roof, after 5 long years of never being in the same country. Continue reading “2011’s Gift of Sisters Galore (a.k.a. the ‘Ganda-mo-teh’ post)”

On keeping and letting go

It was during my layover at HongKong that I learned that my father has passed away while I was dozing on the flight back from Toronto. After several episodes of crying in the departure terminal like a heartbroken OFW that had to leave her sweetheart behind, a thought consoled me — in the moments right after he passed away, I was the closest one to him, all the way up there in the clouds.

I’ve been meaning to post the pics below, although I did not imagine I’ll be putting them up now in such a grave light. Continue reading “On keeping and letting go”

Having a Field Day in Boston

Fenway Park’s a fun place to visit even if you know zilch about baseball (I sashayed in wearing a Miami Heat jersey — wrong sport, for crying out loud!). One thing I discovered was that Boston was home to probably the most loyal fan base of the sport. Locals speak of their home team (and ballpark!) with much pride. Probably the only thing that can match their worship of the Red Sox is their fervent hate of the Yankees. Continue reading “Having a Field Day in Boston”

Crossing Paths with Occupy Wall Street

My sister kidded that maybe I should consider being a journalist instead, since I keep running into the Occupy movements as I move around. We chanced upon Occupy Toronto on a drive downtown, and we literally walked into an Occupy protest march while in Montreal.

The one campsite that I did deliberately flock to was the mother of the movement — the Occupy Wall Street base in Zuccoti Park. I had to see it for myself. Perhaps more than anything, there was this intense desire to witness why these men and women, who had the sheer luck to be born in an affluent nation, have grown so discontent that they had to take to the streets. Shameful it might be to admit, but having grown up in a third world country that has more or less given up in expecting any sort of productivity from its own government, I guess I sort of felt smug. I was genuinely puzzled, and I had this need to understand how protestors on this side of the world felt and what they had to say. Continue reading “Crossing Paths with Occupy Wall Street”